Growing Chinese cabbage, also Wong bok, wong nga pak, napa cabbage

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
                    P P

(Best months for growing Chinese cabbage in New Zealand - cool/mountain regions)

P = Sow seed

  • Easy to grow. Sow direct in the garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 50°F and 68°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 12 inches apart
  • Harvest in 8-10 weeks. Harvest whole head or you can take a few leaves at a time.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Dwarf (bush) beans, beets, celery, cucumber, onions, marigold, nasturtium, rhubarb, aromatic herbs (sage, dill, chamomile, coriander), lettuce, potatoes
  • Avoid growing close to: Climbing (pole) beans, tomato, peppers (chilli, capsicum), eggplant (aubergine), strawberry, mustard

Your comments and tips

15 Sep 14, paulo peterson (USA - Zone 13b climate)
I live in Hawaii tropical climate I am a student at university of Hawaii I want to be a organic farmer some day I am thinking to use bone meal so how I should use?
31 Dec 17, Brian (New Zealand - temperate climate)
I am growing Chinese Cabbage from seed. When they have grown quite leafy some of the leaves go white and paper thin. I am growing in raised garden using growing mixes from a garden centre.
06 May 18, Douglas Geocnadang (United Kingdom - warm/temperate climate)
Want to know more of Wong bak cabbage
31 Aug 18, Jane (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
I have some wombok growing at different stages. My biggest three have lage, widespread leaves but all the pics of wombok I can find show me long, compact vegies. Since I don't know what the wombok should look like I don't know if this is how it should be? Should I let them keep growing in hope that a long central core shapes itself?Or is this the way it's meant to look? To confuse things more, I googled wombok images/Chinese cabbage and found a host of different pics but not one that looks like mine. Thanx in advance.
02 Sep 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
The seeds could be mixed up in the packet or wrong seeds sent. I bought bok choy and end up with Chinese cabbage from an internet seed seller. I have very rich soil (too much filter press applied) and the Chinese cabbage never really developed a head. Huge plants and leaves - no head.
07 Sep 18, Jane (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Thanks Mike. I'll have to google 'filter press'. I bought mine from an internet seller too - same thing!
10 Sep 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Filter press or mill mud is the last pieces/bits of fiber and dirt etc from the process of squashing the juice out of sugar cane. Now days at our local sugar mill they put the fire ash in with it. Very high in P. It doesn't seem much but it has something in it that gives gardens a big lift. It is becoming very expensive (cost of truck to deliver it) compared to fertilisers etc. $120 for a 10 tonne truck load. Down side is you can have a lot of weed seed in it.
11 Sep 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Should be very high in K.
26 Jun 21, Jane (Australia - tropical climate)
Mike, on the off-chance that (3 yrs down the track) you'll read this. I've heard of mill mud. Can I get a smaller quantity and is it possible rid it of seed. Also, how do I use it? Do I dig it into the soil before I plant? Does it smell (mills sometimes do) ? Thnx
18 Jan 21, Joanne (USA - Zone 9a climate)
Mine is doing the same. Wide spread leaves not compact at all.
Showing 11 - 20 of 26 comments

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