All recent comments/discussion

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Showing 1 - 30 of 730 comments
Strawberry Plants 24 Feb, Vicki (USA - Zone 7b climate)
Looking for the best strawberries to grow in Virginia zone 7b.
Cabbage 24 Feb, Tami (USA - Zone 8a climate)
Can you plant cabbage with garlic?
Cabbage 25 Feb, Anonymous (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Go to the cabbage page and read what cabbage is compatible with. The green tick symbol.
Fennel (also Bronze fennel) 21 Feb, colleen (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Thinking of growing fennel for the first time, to attract swallowtails. I've never grown it because I've heard it inhibits the growth of nearby plants. But I'm unclear HOW it does that. Is it a chemical exuded from the roots? In other words, would growing it in a large pot help? Or is it a compound the whole plant gives off, like a pheromone released into the air? One gardener told me they're only allelopathic if allowed to flower. Has this been anyone's experience?
Yacon (also Sunroot) 19 Feb, Pat (USA - Zone 7a climate)
Will yacon roots be safe underneath the ground in the winter and be able to regrow again in spring in zone 7a? (Is it Perennial in zone 7a?) Thank you. Pat
Strawberries (from seeds) 18 Feb, arden sabin (USA - Zone 5a climate)
how to grow climbing strawberries from seeds in a garden out side
Garlic 18 Feb, Wynny (USA - Zone 9a climate)
I live in zone 9a. It is Feb. 17. I would like to know (since I already planted the garlic today) when I can (or can't) harvest. Will I be able to harvest this year, or will I have to wait until next year?Winter, Spring, Summer or Fall?
Garlic 22 Feb, Anonymous (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Lucky for you, you're in the same climate zone as the famous garlic producing town of Gilroy, CA. I understand they plant around late October/November and harvest in June or July. I'm not sure what the result will be for you since you planted yours later and garlic needs a very long season. Try pulling them up in July. If your weather gets very hot before then I'd put some light shade cloth over the garlic to bring the temperature down a few degrees. You may find that your bulbs are smaller than you hoped for, or that it only makes one large clove instead of separate cloves. They should still be good, just not ideal. Then try planting again around Halloween and your garlic should be much bigger next year. Btw, I'm not sure why the chart says garlic shouldn't be planted in 9a. Certainly 9a on the West Coast can and does plant it.
Garlic 19 Feb, Anonymous (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Read the planting notes at the top of the page. Harvest times . Also it does not recommend planting garlic in your climate zone.
Onion 16 Feb, Judith c Greenleaf (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Can I plant onion sets in February or march? what sweet onion varieties do you suggest for No. Ca. marine zone 9B? Thank you.
Onion 17 Feb, Anonymous (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Consult the planting guide calendar and the footnote at the bottom of the page. If it says plant April and you plant Feb, the seeds/sets probably won't germinate/survive . There are reasons why it says to wait until April but take local conditions into considerations.
Potato 14 Feb, Chef (USA - Zone 8a climate)
New to container potatoes Looking at Early types Late types Larger the better Thank you all for your time
Potato 16 Feb, Anonymous (USA - Zone 4a climate)
Look up the internet for varieties in your state/country.
French tarragon 12 Feb, Sonja (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Any idea who sells it in CA? Can’t find anything but Russian Tarragon! Thank you
French tarragon 16 Feb, (USA - Zone 4a climate)
Try seed selling companies on the net.
Sweet corn (also corn,maize) 12 Feb, Pamela Newman (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Names of sweet corn grown in Goleta CA. Zone 9b, please. Thank you!!!
Sweet corn (also corn,maize) 15 Feb, Anonymous (USA - Zone 5a climate)
You can grow most corns anywhere, just get the planting time right.
Artichokes (Globe) 09 Feb, Joseph Thomas (USA - Zone 9a climate)
What is the best artichoke species for Tucson Arizona zone 9?
Potato 09 Feb, Patricia Adams (USA - Zone 8b climate)
I'm a beginner an is really fascinated with patio & container garden.what information can you give to be successful
Potato 12 Feb, colleen (USA - Zone 10b climate)
That's a big subject! I'd say it depends on what you're trying to achieve. Do you just want a few really good veggies? Do you want to grow as much of your daily food as possible? Does your garden need to be aesthetically pleasing? There are lots of books on container gardening, you could try browsing your local library online. If space is limited, I say think about which veggies you love the most, which are pricey at the store, and which are most improved by eating fresh. Basil and salad greens for instance, are very easy to grow but very overpriced at the store. Corn and tomatoes are so much better homegrown. Whereas potatoes and onions are cheap at the store and not THAT much better homegrown so they're only worth it if you have plenty of space to devote. My advice for a beginner would be to start small and manageable, and build on that each year. Maybe this year buy a couple of Earthboxes or DIY a knockoff, and just grow a few of your favorite veggies. This will also reveal what some of your challenges might be. For instance my first year raccoons ate all my sweet corn, that taught me I would need a good fence in the future. ;-)
Potato 11 Feb, Gary Hall (Australia - arid climate)
Patricia you need to find out what the Potato season is for your climate Zone 8b is check with local Nursery or where you buy seed potato don't use culinary potato's as they might have fungus or disease.
Beans - climbing (also Pole beans, Runner beans, Scarlet Runners) 09 Feb, McDaniel (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Can you start pole beans inside instead of outside. My ground not ready yet
Beans - climbing (also Pole beans, Runner beans, Scarlet Runners) 15 Feb, Anonymous (USA - Zone 5a climate)
You have to be very careful growing seedlings indoors. New seedlings chase the sunlight and become very long (leggy) and thin stalked and therefore weak. Easy to snap the stalk. I germinate seed under shade cloth part day in sun, part day in shade. Two days after germination I take the shade cloth off. I move the table to vary the hours of sunlight and shade depending on how small/big seedlings are and what the temperature is.
Tomato 08 Feb, Joe Musselwhite (USA - Zone 10a climate)
What type tomatoes are best or grow area 10a and should they be determinate or indeterminate?
Tomato 13 Feb, SarahM (USA - Zone 10b climate)
In 10b here. You can grow either. Determinate only grow to size, produce fruit then die off. You would grow them in succession to get get tomatoes all season. Indeterminate tomatoes require space as the plants just keeps growing [kinda like a vine] while we have long days of sunlight. Better to decide what type of tomato fruit you want [paste, slicer, etc...].
Tomato 12 Feb, Colleen (USA - Zone 10b climate)
You can grow any tomato your heart desires in your zone! Do you like great big beefy slicing tomatoes? Little cherry tomatoes to eat like snacks? Plum tomatoes to make into sauce or sun-dry? All will do great. You may need to use shade cloth in the hottest months to keep them from scorching (I get 40 percent shade cloth from San Diego Seed Company but Amazon has lots of cheaper ones too). If you try to keep them alive through winter, assuming they don't have blight, you can string incandescent Christmas lights around them and cover with fleece if frost threatens. Indeterminate types are basically perennials and will get huge and possibly survive the winter in your zone, so space may be an issue. I usually have ONE big indeterminate sprawler like a Juliet or a Sungold, and let grow as big as it wants on a tower made of cattle panels, and then grow a number of compact bush tomatoes to get some varied crops for slicing, drying, saucing, etc. In your zone you can constantly start new
Cucumber 08 Feb, Lisa (USA - Zone 9a climate)
I heard they, like peas, don’t transplant well BUT you could start them in peat pots so the process of transplanting is less stressful. So I guess the answer is, “Yes, sow them indoors in peat pots.”
Peas 07 Feb, Mimi (USA - Zone 7b climate)
How tall do pea vines grow? I am trying to determine how tall my supports need to be. Also, what kind of soil and how much sunshine do they prefer? Thanks!
Peas 08 Feb, Anonymous (USA - Zone 4a climate)
5-6' tall, good rich friable soil and sun most of the day.
Onion 03 Feb, Sky Kell (USA - Zone 7b climate)
Perennial onion that multiplies for 7b zone
Showing 1 - 30 of 730 comments
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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. GardenGrow is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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