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Showing 31 - 60 of 605 comments
Carrot 17 Aug, Fran (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Will it be too late to sow these in early September?
Tomato 17 Aug, Jerry nordin (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Planted indeterminate in April hard freeze late in may covered plants at night until night temps reached 60f. Planted in elevated box planters. Is this enough soil for the roots plants never really produced. Im looking at the last tomato of the year 8-17-20.
Tomato 19 Aug, Anonymous (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Tomatoes need good rich deep soil. Dig your soil about 40cm deep x about 60cm across. Put some fertiliser in the bottom of the hole and mix with some soil. Keep doing this until the hole is only 10cm deep. Put some Epsom salts in the hole also. When the plant has grown 60-80cm high fill the soil in around the plant and even hill it up a bit. Put some compost/mulch around the plant. Tomatoes need a good deep watering 2-3 times a week.
Okra (also Ladyfinger, gumbo) 16 Aug, Rachelle Brunetta (USA - Zone 10b climate)
I am in San Diego zone 10b, is it too late to plant okra in mid August ? (Gardenate : Check here www.gardenate.com/plant/Okra?zone=100 )
Okra (also Ladyfinger, gumbo) 09 Sep, Sandra (USA - Zone 10b climate)
You can continue to plant okra so long as your weather stays warm to hot, so I just planted out 3 plants about two inches tall, they should produce until it’s too cold for them, they may live through the cold and maybe not. But do plant them where they get full sun all day whether the weather is cold or hot, they tolerate drought, very tough plant. Freeze anything you don’t eat right away. Pick often to produce more.
Okra (also Ladyfinger, gumbo) 22 Aug, colleen (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Hi! I'm also in San Diego 10b. Sometimes my okra makes it all the way through the winter and sometimes it doesn't (same with my eggplants), as they're both perennials that hate frost. So much of it is luck--or where they're planted in the yard. If they're near my South wall they always make it. I say give it a shot! They'll grow FAST at first, much faster than when planted in March. You'll get a small harvest in November, and then the plants will not grow much until the weather warms back up in Feb/March, if they make it. I suggest cutting them to 1-2 feet tall in late November and covering them with garden fleece anytime light frost is threatened. If they survive the winter they'll come back in a bushier form and you'll be way ahead for next year.
Okra (also Ladyfinger, gumbo) 18 Aug, (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Give it a try if you like. Look at your local conditions. They require warm/hot conditions by the look of it. If you don't produce a good crop then next year plant earlier as they suggest here.
Garlic 11 Aug, Dan (USA - Zone 7a climate)
I bought a pack of two christopher ranch organic garlic from grocery store. How do I know if it's soft neck or hard neck.
Garlic 26 Aug, Robert (USA - Zone 9b climate)
When you break open the clove of garlic hardneck has a hard stem in the center. Softneck garlic does not. Most grocery store varieties are soft neck.
Garlic 13 Aug, Anonymous (USA - Zone 9a climate)
The Christopher ranch is only the company name, not the variety of garlic. Work out the variety name and google it or ring C R. Google the difference between soft and hard garlic.
Sweet corn (also maize) 10 Aug, Jesus E Amaya (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Is the a particular variety of sweet corn I should plant in Zone 10b?
Sweet corn (also maize) 11 Aug, Anonymous (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Not really, comes down to what kind of sweet corn you like. Or ask around local people who grow sweet corn in your area. I grow a bi-color variety in warm climates in Australia.
Tomato 10 Aug, Gina (USA - Zone 10b climate)
I grow everything in pots due to lack of any place to have a full garden. After the tomato plant is done for the season, what can I grow in the container that will enhance the soil for the next year's tomato plantings? In years past, if I reuse the same soil the plants do not do very well year after year. It is not easy to dump the old soil and start fresh - again, no real space to do so. I had two San Marzano plants that did very well plus one small patio tomatoe Any suggestions are appreciated. Thank you!
Tomato 12 Aug, colleen (USA - Zone 10b climate)
I suggest growing a legume you like--or a succession of them. You could start with beans and then peas when the days get very short. If you like fava beans, those are very useful--you can eat the tender shoots and leaves, and they make big beautiful plants with pretty flowers that look so cheerful in the coolest months (but they take a LONG time to make beans!). When the beans/peas are done, leave their roots behind in the soil. They'll add a little nitrogen, though not as much if you let them grow to maturity. You will still need to replenish other nutrients with compost or a good tomato-specific fertilizer in the spring. One thing to consider is that tomatoes catch a lot of diseases that accumulate in the soil year after year, so that might be why you have trouble when reusing the soil. You could try solarizing any infected soil by covering it with clear plastic in full sun for a few hot months (March through June minimum), but that's tough when garden space is precious!
Tomato 11 Aug, Sally O'Neil (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Compost and/or Manure
Daikon (also Japanese radish, Lo Bok) 03 Aug, Alice (USA - Zone 5b climate)
My diakons grew long leaves that are flowering already and the roots are only 1 or 2 inches. Do I need to pull them?
Daikon (also Japanese radish, Lo Bok) 06 Aug, Anon (USA - Zone 2a climate)
Too rich a soil probably. Radish do not like rich soil, produces all leaf.
Cape Gooseberry (also Golden Berry, Inca Berry ) 31 Jul, (USA - Zone 4a climate)
We live just outside Portland Or. does anyone know what client zone that is? Gardenate reply - Have you checked here /www.gardenate.com/zones/#zone-US ?
Tomato 30 Jul, lisa johnson (USA - Zone 8b climate)
cannot get my tomatoes to form fruit - in large containers - dropping flowers before forming - all varieties - healthy plants but no fruit - extremely hot in Southern Alabama with humidity and good rain - what times of year are best to plant —please advise!
Tomato 10 Aug, Janelle (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I just pull mine for the same reason. Is too hot to fruit. When the flower form the sun burn it. And the rain doesn't help much. If you are able to move it under a roof and keep it with sunlight, you may hold on until it gets cooler. It will produce then. Also it is time to start sowing tomatoes seeds indoor or in shade. Good luck!
Horseradish 30 Jul, Quaid (USA - Zone 6b climate)
I bought some horseradish a couple weeks ago that i have in peat moss inside the house. If i plant them outside in early autumn, can i leave them outside over winter?
Garlic 28 Jul, John Madison (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Your notes say garlic is not recommended for zone 9 b. Why not? Thanks
Garlic 14 Sep, Jett Town (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I live in zone 9b and the commercial farmers harvest their garlic in June and July. Garlic grows well here. I believe that it is planted in January - the soft neck type.
Garlic 06 Aug, Anonymous (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Read the notes here and then think about your climate, weather and soil temperatures. If it says you need this this and that and you don't have those conditions then it is not likely to grow. Some crops are cool weather some need warm/hot temps.
Cucumber 27 Jul, Shannon (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Does anyone know why not to plant close to tomatos? My garden plan has tomatos, sunflowers, and cucumbers vined along my fence. Should I move the tomatoes to where my snap peas will grow and put snap peas where tomatos were going to be?
Cucumber 07 Aug, Liz (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Check here https://thehomestead.guru/companion-planting-2/
Coriander (also Cilantro, Chinese parsley) 27 Jul, Anila (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Can I grow cilantro indoors starting the end of July? Or, outdoors only?
Coriander (also Cilantro, Chinese parsley) 28 Jul, Sandra G. (USA - Zone 10b climate)
You can plant cilantro all year; during cooler season you may start in tray/cups whatever method and plant out when it's about one inch tall. And if you have hot weather like us in California, you can direct sow the seeds anyplace in the garden, walk around and take a good look see, anyplace where there's shade, drop some seeds. I direct sow in my containers under the zucchini, around the tomatoes, under the marigolds (my marigolds are three feet tall), basically, anyplace in the shade, and remember, cilantro is cut and come again, pick often, because if you let it grow to coriander (to seed-can grow to five feet tall), then you can save the seeds after you let the plant dry out save the flowers because they become seeds. You can get hundreds of seeds from just one plant. Good luck!
Luffa (also Loofah, plant sponge) 23 Jul, Dan (USA - Zone 5a climate)
How much sun do they need
Luffa (also Loofah, plant sponge) 07 Aug, Liz (USA - Zone 8a climate)
An internet search might help, try 'loofah' as an alternative to 'luffa'
Showing 31 - 60 of 605 comments
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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. GardenGrow is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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