Growing Peas

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
            P P P P    

(Best months for growing Peas in New Zealand - cool/mountain regions)

P = Sow seed

  • Easy to grow. Sow in garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 46°F and 75°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 2 - 3 inches apart
  • Harvest in 9-11 weeks. Pick the pods every day to increase production.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Potatoes

Your comments and tips

06 May 19, Green thumb (New Zealand - sub-tropical climate)
Beans and peas are nitrogen fixing.
07 Oct 18, robert newman (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Why can't i grow snow peas , got healthy green plants but no peas
07 Oct 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Depends on the variety. Some are smaller plants and flower from about 8 weeks
11 Oct 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
They cut half of my comment off. Some peas grow to 4-5' before flowering. After 8-10 weeks you should have flowers. (Mike, I did not cut your comment. It arrived cut off - Liz @gardenate)
12 Oct 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Liz - this happens to me quite a few times - any reason. Do i not give it enough time to up load???? Most of your 'comments' arrive complete, so that is probably the reason - Liz
10 Sep 18, Adam (Australia - temperate climate)
Hi everyone, does anyone know if I can grow black chick peas (Kala Chana) in South Australia? Is it just shown here on this site as Peas? Thanks, Adam.
11 Sep 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Chick peas plant winter early spring. If it becomes hot mulch the soil. Look up on the internet.
18 Aug 18, Jane (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Re: lower stalk and leaves of climbing Alderman peas. The lower leaves are going yellow and look as if they are dying and the very bottom of the stalks on two look dried up compared to a couple of smaller plants that still look a softer fleshy green. Are they dying or thirsty or lacking something or other or is this a normal process for the pea plant? Thanx.
13 Jul 19, Anne (Australia - temperate climate)
I would look at the ph level (acidity /alkalinity) of the soil. Peas like soil on the alkaline side which is why they say to put some lime in the soil before planting. A little ph test kit is a good investment and can save you a lot of disappointment and money from plants dropping dead because the soil is wrong for them. Garden veg also need good drainage. If soil is a bit boggy, hill it up and plant in the higher part.
11 Aug 18, Judith peters (Australia - temperate climate)
Can anyone tell me where i can buy fresh peas in pods to cook, can't find them these days
Showing 21 - 30 of 150 comments

i live in Darwin, i'm looking for a produce making plant that i can plant in full sun straight into the ground. Darwin sun is harsh and easil >8hrs per day of sunshine in dry season. i'm finding it impossible to get pigeon peas and the nurseries here are rubbish for edible stuffs. anything i can just get from woolies/coles and propagate/grow? sorry if the question is really particular, but i'd hate to just have a garden growing stuff to just stare at and i'm lucky enough to have a great garden. thanks heaps in advance

- Vishal

Please provide your email address if you are hoping for a reply


All comments are reviewed before displaying on the site, so your posting will not appear immediately

Gardenate App

Put GardenGrow in your pocket. Get our app for iPhone, iPad or Android to add your own plants and record your plantings and harvests

Planting Reminders

Join our 60,000+ gardeners who already use GardenGrow and subscribe to the free GardenGrow planting reminders email newsletter.


Home | Vegetables and herbs to plant | Climate zones | About GardenGrow | Contact us | Privacy Policy

This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. GardenGrow is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
We cannot help if you are overrun by giant slugs.