Keep your garden growing - see what to plant right now

Growing Leeks

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
S S T T         S S T T

(Best months for growing Leeks in New Zealand - cool/mountain regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays T = Plant out (transplant) seedlings

  • Easy to grow. Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 46°F and 86°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 4 - 8 inches apart
  • Harvest in 15-18 weeks. Loosen with a fork rather than pull by hand..
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Carrots

Your comments and tips

22 Feb 19, Michael (Australia - temperate climate)
Look up some varieties on the net and pick one and try it.
08 Feb 19, Charlotte (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
I have grown leeks but found that they often have a hard inedible inner stalk when harvested. What have I done wrong?
11 Feb 19, Oliver (Australia - temperate climate)
Have you let them flower? My experience is once they send up that flower stalk.. that is the woody centre stalk. You need to harvest before this happens. Otherwise you just have to slice along the leek and pull this stalk out and use the softer outside bits in a stew or tart. Leek and fetta tarts are awesome:)
10 Feb 19, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Could be dryness. Try and have a consistent soil moisture. Check plant and harvest times.
08 Jan 19, michelle (New Zealand - temperate climate)
Hi have just dug up leeks as they seemed to go woody and flower so quick this year. I found lots of bulbs underground are just like elephant garlic, some with babies. Do they behave like garlic? or am I just finding previous elephant garlic bulbs left behind that have sprouted or maybe none of them were the leek plants at all that I purchased ? confused Michelle
10 Jan 19, Mike (New Zealand - temperate climate)
Sounds like you planted them late in the season. Look at the guide here - maybe plant seed March and transplant 4-6 weeks later. Then harvest 11-13 weeks later. They should look like a leek not garlic. Do some research on the internet - how to grow leeks.
03 Dec 18, Genevieve Radley (New Zealand - temperate climate)
What season are leeks harvested in NZ? Thanks :)
04 Dec 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Read the notes here about growing it. It tells you when to plant and how long until harvest.
10 Nov 18, Leeanne newnam (Australia - temperate climate)
When do leeks go in and how long till they harvest, is it summer or winter?
12 Nov 18, Mike (Australia - temperate climate)
Read the notes here - it is all there. I'd suggest you plant them in Autumn and pick them about 5 mths later.
Showing 11 - 20 of 119 comments

"When leeks have gone to seed, they become tough and inedible. Below you will find some tips on stopping the leek flowering or bolting. Why a Leek Plant Flowers and Bolts. When many plants bolt or go to seed, like broccoli or basil, it is due to warm temperatures. With leeks, it’s different. When leeks go to seed, it is normally due to being exposed to optimal temperatures followed by cold temperatures. In other words, a leek flowering is due to cold weather, not warm weather. When a leek flowers, it causes the neck or lower stem of the leek to become woody and tough and the leek will become bitter. While you can technically still eat leeks are gone to seed, you probably won’t like the flavor". Leeks take about 100-120 days to grow - so if you planted in mid winter (July 14th) it is now 3 1/2 mths - 100+ days - suggestion, pull them out if they look nice and tender - if looking woody, you have left it too late.

- Mike

Please provide your email address if you are hoping for a reply


All comments are reviewed before displaying on the site, so your posting will not appear immediately

Gardenate App

Put GardenGrow in your pocket. Get our app for iPhone, iPad or Android to add your own plants and record your plantings and harvests

Planting Reminders

Join our 60,000+ gardeners who already use GardenGrow and subscribe to the free GardenGrow planting reminders email newsletter.


Home | Vegetables and herbs to plant | Climate zones | About GardenGrow | Contact us | Privacy Policy

This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. GardenGrow is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
We cannot help if you are overrun by giant slugs.